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Justice Kennedy’s Role in Fisher and the Reality of Race Those of us in the social science community who have been following the Fisher case know that the U.S. Supreme Court's decision, like the 2003 decisions in Grutter v. Bollinger and Gratz v. Bollinger, could have a lasting impact on the practices and policies of postsecondary institutions across the country.
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Critical Mess One of the rhetorical puzzles that arose during Supreme Court arguments in the Fisher case, in which a white student challenges the race-conscious admissions system at the University of Texas, poses a "catch-22" that could spell the end of affirmative action.
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The Stories a Classroom Tells Many years ago when I was a student in a teacher certification program, one of our daily requirements was to observe the classroom of a different teacher in the school.
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Too Much Diversity?: The Abigail Fisher Case and Race in College Admissions On October 10th, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in a case contesting the use of race in college admissions brought by petitioner, Abigail Noel Fisher, against The University of Texas at Austin.
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Education for a Civil Society Two myths arise in almost all discussions of civic education: "Kids today don't know any civics," and "We don't teach civics nowadays." As I argue in my chapter in Making Civics Count, civic education does need reform, but we must first get the facts straight.
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Bringing Learning to Life in the Classroom It was the beginning of the spring semester in a large urban high school. The student teacher, having just taken over the class from her cooperating teacher, was attempting a class discussion using a protocol in which students talked to one another rather than through the teacher in the usual wagon wheel format. As her university supervisor, I was seated in a corner, observing, taking notes, and preparing to offer support and feedback.
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Coping with Racial Trauma in Doctoral Study Let us introduce you to John. He was the first in his family to graduate from college and came from a low-income background. John's advisors, a White couple, recruited him into his graduate program. They promised him four years of full funding and touted the fact that he would be the first Vietnamese American to graduate from their doctoral institution.
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First Things First: Being an Instructional Leader Not long ago, principals were simply expected to be administrators. No one should think that "simply" implies that administering a school well is in any way simple or easy.
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Academic Return on Investment: Spending Only on What Works Duh! Who wants to spend money on what doesn't help kids learn? No one. But how many superintendents and school boards know what actually works in their district? Not too many.
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Reputations (and More) at Risk: Using Value-Added Reports Responsibly The insights gained from teacher value-added reports have the potential to benefit schools, students, and communities. However, because these reports are generated from complex statistical methods that rely on inaccurate or incomplete data and have wide margins of error, more responsible use of these reports is needed to reap their benefits--and minimize their risks.
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