Harvard Educational Review
  1. Summer 1964 Issue »

    Three Processes in the Child's Acquisition of Syntax

    Roger Brown, Ursula Bellugi
    Some time in the second six months of life most children say a first intelligible word. A few months later most children are saying many words and some children go about the house all day long naming things (table, doggie, ball, etc.) and actions (play, see, drop, etc.) and an occasional quality (blue, broke, bad, etc.). At about eighteen months children are likely to begin constructing two-word utterances; such a one, for instance, as Push car.

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    Summer 1964 Issue

    Abstracts

    Introduction
    Janet A. Emig, James T. Fleming, Helen M. Popp
    Three Processes in the Child's Acquisition of Syntax
    Roger Brown, Ursula Bellugi
    Language Disorders in Childhood
    Eric H. Lenneberg
    Words, Meanings and Concepts
    John B. Carroll
    Language and the School Child
    Martin Joos
    Mencken Revisited
    Raven I. McDavid, Jr.
    Geography and the American Language
    AN APPROACH TO LITERACY
    Louis A. Muinzer
    Underlying and Superficial Linguistic Structure
    Paul M. Postal
    What Grammar?
    H. A. Gleason, Jr.
    Around the Edge of Language
    Intonation
    Dwight L. Bolinger
    Symposium
    The Use of English in World Literatures: INTRODUCTION
    The Language of African Literature
    Ezekiel Mphahlele
    The Use of English in Australian Literature
    Arthur Delbridge
    English in the West Indies, or the West Indies in English?
    J. L. Dillard
    Indian Writing in English
    P. Lal
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