Harvard Educational Review
  1. Winter 1977 Issue »

    Teaching Reading and Language to the Disadvantaged

    What We Have Learned from Field Research

    Wesley C. Becker
    In late 1967, Project Follow Through was reorganized to select, test, and evaluate promising but different educational programs for disadvantaged youngsters in the first three grades. Now, nearly ten years later, the completed evaluations of Follow Through suggest that one of these programs, the University of Oregon's Direct Instruction Model, has produced significant gains in measures of positive affect, basic skills, and conceptual reasoning. In this article, Wesley Becker discusses the distinctive features of this model—its underlying assumptions and basic teaching components. He then explores the implications of teaching reading and language skills to economically disadvantaged children and advocates that immediate steps be taken to teach vocabulary systematically throughout the school years. Viewing this goal as essential for compensatory education, he concludes with an analysis of how vocabulary instruction might best be implemented.

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    Winter 1977 Issue

    Abstracts

    In a Different Voice
    Women's Conceptions of Self and of Morality
    Carol Gilligan
    Teaching Reading and Language to the Disadvantaged
    What We Have Learned from Field Research
    Wesley C. Becker
    Pierre Bourdieu
    The Cultural Transmission of Social Inequality
    David Swartz
    Bernstein and Durkheim
    Two Theories of Change in Educational Systems
    Mohamed Cherkaoui
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