Harvard Educational Review
  1. Fall 1988 Issue »

    The Silenced Dialogue

    Power and Pedagogy in Educating Other People's Children

    Lisa D. Delpit
    Lisa Delpit uses the debate over process-oriented versus skills-oriented writing instruction as the starting-off point to examine the "culture of power” that exists in society in general and in the educational environment in particular. She analyzes five complex rules of power that explicitly and implicitly influence the debate over meeting the educational needs of Black and poor students on all levels. Delpit concludes that teachers must teach all students the explicit and implicit rules of power as a first step toward a more just society. This article is an edited version of a speech presented at the Ninth Annual Ethnography in Education Research Forum, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, February 5—6, 1988.

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    Fall 1988 Issue

    Abstracts

    Rethinking Liberal and Radical Perspectives on Racial Inequality in Schooling
    Making the Case for Nonsynchrony
    Cameron McCarthy
    The Silenced Dialogue
    Power and Pedagogy in Educating Other People's Children
    Lisa D. Delpit
    Racism in Academia
    The Old Wolf Revisited
    Maria de la Luz Reyes and John J. Halcon
    Wounding the Spirit
    Discrimination and Traditional American Indian Belief Systems
    Carol Locust
    Ethnic Prejudice
    Still Alive and Hurtful
    Valerie Ooka Pang
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