Harvard Educational Review
  1. Fall 2006 Issue »

    The Aspira Consent Decree

    A Thirtieth-Anniversary Retrospective of Bilingual Education in New York City

    Luis O. Reyes
    In this article, Luis O. Reyes provides a retrospective of the historic 1974 Aspira Consent Decree between the New York City Board of Education and Aspira of New York, which established bilingual instruction as a legally enforceable federal entitlement for New York City’s non-English-speaking Puerto Rican and Latino students. Reyes analyzes the fate of the Aspira Consent Decree over the last thirty years. He discusses the demographic and sociopolitical changes between 1974 and the present, the pedagogical and political struggles associated with the consent decree over the years, the lessons learned, and the emerging trends and prospects for bilingual education in New York City’s public school system, which is now under direct mayoral control.

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    Fall 2006 Issue

    Abstracts

    Sexuality Education and Desire
    Still Missing after All These Years
    Michelle Fine and Sara McClelland
    What Community Participation in Schooling Means
    Insights from Southern Ethiopia
    Jennifer Swift-Morgan
    The Aspira Consent Decree
    A Thirtieth-Anniversary Retrospective of Bilingual Education in New York City
    Luis O. Reyes
    Implementing Small Theme High Schools in New York City
    Great Intentions and Great Tensions
    Jacqueline Ancess and David Allen

    Book Notes

    Teaching by Heart
    By Sara Day Hatton

    Raising Biracial Children
    By Kerry Ann Rockquemore and Tracey Laszloffy

    Critical Perspectives
    Edited by Caron Atlas and Pam Korza

    Three Magic Letters
    By Michael T. Nettles and Catherine M. Millett