Harvard Educational Review
  1. Winter 2010 Issue »

    Unseen Workers in the Academic Factory

    Perceptions of Neoracism Among International Postdocs in the United States and the United Kingdom

    Brendan Cantwell and Jenny J. Lee
    In this article, Brendan Cantwell and Jenny J. Lee examine the experiences of international postdocs and their varying career paths in the current political economy of academic capitalism through the lens of neoracism. Using in-depth interviews with science and engineering faculty and international postdocs in the United States and the United Kingdom, the authors identify differing faculty expectations and treatment of international postdocs. They further reveal culturally specific stereotypes that negatively affected postdocs’ work opportunities as they moved toward their professoriate career. The authors extend the concept of neoracism in globalized higher education by examining the larger structures of the academic job market and varying degrees of opportunity, depending on one’s country of origin as reported by faculty and postdocs.

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    Brendan Cantwell is a postdoctoral research associate in the Institute of Higher Education at the University of Georgia. Previously Cantwell worked as a postdoc in the Center for the Study of Higher Education at the University of Arizona, where he also received his PhD. His work focuses on the political economy of higher education, with a focus on organization, policy, and internationalization. His work has appeared in journals such as Comparative Education and Higher Education.

    Jenny J. Lee is an associate professor of higher education in the Center for the Study of Higher Education at the University of Arizona. Her research encompasses a range of higher education issues that center on the role of individual and collective consciousness in shaping the culture and ultimately the practices of higher institutions and their students. As examples, she has examined faculty cultures, college access and outreach, and students’ spirituality. Most recently, Lee has worked on several projects related to international students’ access to higher education and their experiences in higher education institutions. Lee’s research has appeared in top higher education journals such as Higher Education, Research in Higher Education, Review of Higher Education, and Journal of Higher Education.

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    Winter 2010 Issue

    Abstracts

    A Celebratory Pause—The 80th Anniversary of the Harvard Educational Review
    Legacy and Vision
    HER Editorial Board 2010–2011
    Learning to Laugh
    A Portrait of Risk and Resilience in Early Childhood
    Travis Wright
    White Institutional Presence
    The Impact of Whiteness on Campus Climate
    Diane Lynn Gusa
    Unseen Workers in the Academic Factory
    Perceptions of Neoracism Among International Postdocs in the United States and the United Kingdom
    Brendan Cantwell and Jenny J. Lee
    “Education Is All About Opportunities, Isn’t It?”
    A Biographical Perspective on Learning and Teaching English in Sri Lanka
    David Hayes
    Embedded, Emboldened, and (Net)Working for Change
    Support-Seeking and Teacher Agency in Urban, High-Needs Schools
    Lauren Anderson

    Book Notes

    Waiting for “Superman”
    Davis Guggenheim (Director)

    Saving Schools
    Paul E. Peterson