Harvard Educational Review
  1. Fall 2011 Issue »

    Elementary Forms of Cosmopolitanism

    Blood, Birth, and Bodies in Immigrant New York City

    Maria Kromidas
    HER Fall 2011 SmIn this article, Maria Kromidas explores how nine-, ten-, and eleven-year-old children in a diverse neighborhood school in immigrant New York City navigated and often undermined hegemonic notions of difference and belonging offered by mainstream multiculturalism and raciology. Based on ethnographic research and utilizing a fine-grained sociocultural linguistic analysis, Kromidas demonstrates how the children subverted the most dehumanizing elements of these ideologies—most notably their essentialism and absolutism and their basis in blood, birth, and bodies. She argues that the children provide a compelling vision for living with difference, one that emerged from the rich experiences and everyday-ness of multiracial living.

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    Maria Kromidas is an assistant professor of anthropology at William Paterson University. Her work revolves around issues of social difference, posthumanism, and cosmopolitanism and how these sites can be rethought with and through the critical space provided by childhood. She has contributed to the volumes Children Under Construction: Critical Essays on Play as Curriculum (Peter Lang, 2010) and The Politics of Interculturality (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2011). Her current pedagogical and research efforts concern helping teachers grapple with the complexity of race in children’s everyday lives.
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    Fall 2011 Issue

    Abstracts

    Immigration, Youth, and Education
    Editors’ Introduction
    Soojin S. Oh and North Cooc
    The Power of Context
    State-Level Policies and Politics and the Educational Performance of the Children of Immigrants in the United States
    Alexandra Filindra, David Blanding, and Cynthia Garcia Coll
    Growing Up in the Shadows
    The Developmental Implications of Unauthorized Status
    Carola Suárez-Orozco, Hirokazu Yoshikawa, Robert T. Teranishi, and Marcelo M. Suárez-Orozco
    “Because We Feel the Pressure and We Also Feel the Support”
    Examining the Educational Success of Undocumented Immigrant Latina/o Students
    LAURA E. ENRIQUEZ
    Things I’ll Never Say
    Stories of Growing Up Undocumented in the United States
    INGRID HERNANDEZ, FERMÍN MENDOZA, MARIO LIO, JIRAYUT LATTHI, and CATHERINE EUSEBIO Educators for Fair Consideration
    Undocumented to Hyperdocumented
    A Jornada of Protection, Papers, and PhD Status
    AURORA CHANG
    Whose Deficit Is This Anyhow?
    Exploring Counter-Stories of Somali Bantu Refugees’ Experiences in “Doing School”
    LAURA A. ROY and KEVIN C. ROXAS
    Toward a Pedagogy of Acompañamiento
    Mexican Migrant Youth Writing from the Underside of Modernity
    ENRIQUE SEPÚLVEDA III
    Elementary Forms of Cosmopolitanism
    Blood, Birth, and Bodies in Immigrant New York City
    Maria Kromidas

    Book Notes

    Immigrants Raising Citizens
    Hirokazu Yoshikawa

    Balancing Acts
    Natasha K. Warikoo