Harvard Educational Review
  1. Summer 2013 Issue »

    A Gifted Education

    GRAHAM OLIVER
    Start with a low point. It’s a public school bathroom. A boy, fifteen, maybe sixteen, walks in—T-shirt, jeans, burst of curly hair. He sets a piece of paper on the counter next to the sink. From his pocket he pulls out a tiny Ziploc bag, a single-edge razor blade, and a short segment of a straw. It takes him a minute to open the bag; his fingers are shaking beyond their typical pubescent clumsiness. Onto the piece of paper tumble two small blue pills. First he places the blade on top of them, then presses his palm down, as a chef would do to cloves of garlic, until the pills give way and break apart under the force. Then he begins to chop, aiming for the large pieces, methodically sweeping the debris into a pile, repeating until only a fine powder remains. Satisfied, he bends over and places the straw to his nose with one hand and presses the opposing nostril closed with the other. He vacuums up the powder into an abused sinus cavity, then turns and walks back out the door to finish the school day.

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    This is an excerpt from the Harvard Educational Review article "A Gifted Education."

    Graham Oliver is a freelance writer and a student in the master of arts in rhetoric and composition program at Texas State University. He received his BA from Southwestern University. His prose and poems have appeared in Punchnel’s, Front Porch Journal, Cenizo, and the 2013 Texas Poetry Calendar. Oliver’s work continues to focus on using personal narrative to explore wider social questions.
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    Summer 2013 Issue

    Abstracts

    Leaving the Space Better Than You Found It Through Song
    Music, Diversity, and Mission in One Black Student Organization
    SHERRY L. DECKMAN
    A Gifted Education
    GRAHAM OLIVER
    The Importance of Still Teaching the iGeneration
    New Technologies and the Centrality of Pedagogy
    THOMAS M. PHILIP and ANTERO D. GARCIA
    For Colored Kids Who Committed Suicide, Our Outrage Isn’t Enough
    Queer Youth of Color, Bullying, and the Discursive Limits of Identity and Safety
    Eric Darnell Pritchard

    Book Notes

    Beyond Binaries in Education Research
    edited by Warren Midgley, Mark A. Tyler, Patrick Alan Danaher, and Alison Mander

    Educational Experiences of Hidden Homeless Teenagers Living Doubled-Up
    Ronald E. Hallett