Harvard Educational Review
  1. Spring 2014 Issue »

    Culturally Relevant Pedagogy 2.0

    a.k.a. the Remix

    GLORIA LADSON-BILLINGS
    In this article, Ladson-Billings reflects on the history of her theory of culturally relevant pedagogy and the ways it has been used and misused since its inception. She argues for the importance of dynamic scholarship and suggests that it is time for a “remix” of her original theory: culturally sustaining pedagogy, as proposed by Paris (2012). Ladson-Billings discusses her work with the hip-hop and spoken word program First Wave as an example of how culturally sustaining pedagogy allows for a fluid understanding of culture, and a teaching practice that explicitly engages questions of equity and justice. Influenced by her experience with the First Wave program, Ladson-Billings welcomes the burgeoning literature on culturally sustaining pedagogy as a way to push forward her original goals of engaging critically in the cultural landscapes of classrooms and teacher education programs. 

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    Gloria Ladson-Billings is the Kellner Family Professor of Urban Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction and a faculty affiliate in the Department of Educational Policy Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Her research examines the pedagogical practices of teachers who are successful with African American students and critical race theory applications to education. She is the author of the critically acclaimed books The Dreamkeepers: Successful Teachers of African American Children (2nd ed., 2009, Jossey-Bass) and Crossing Over to Canaan: The Journey of New Teachers in Diverse Classrooms (2001, Jossey-Bass), as well as numerous journal articles and book chapters. Her work has won numerous scholarly awards, including the H. I. Romnes Faculty Fellowship, the Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship, and the Palmer O. Johnson Memorial Award for outstanding research. Ladson-Billings is the recipient of honorary doctorates from Umeå University, Sweden; the University of Massachusetts–Lowell; and the University of Alicante, Spain. She is also the 2004 recipient of the George and Louise Spindler Award for ongoing contributions in educational anthropology, given by the Council on Anthropology and Education of the American Anthropological Association, the 2005–2006 president of the American Educational Research Association, and a member of the National Academy of Education.  
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    Spring 2014 Issue

    Abstracts

    What Are We Seeking to Sustain Through Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy?
    A Loving Critique Forward
    DJANGO PARIS and H. SAMY ALIM
    “A Slow Revolution”
    Toward a Theory of Intellectual Playfulness in High School Classrooms
    SARAH M. FINE
    Designing Educative Curriculum Materials
    A Theoretically and Empirically Driven Process
    ELIZABETH A. DAVIS, ANNEMARIE SULLIVAN PALINCSAR, ANNA MARIA ARIAS, AMBER SCHULTZ BISMACK, LOREN M. MARULIS, STEFANIE K. IWASHYNA
    Parental Authority over Education and the Right to Invite
    BRYAN R. WARNICK
    Symposium: Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy
    Culturally Relevant Pedagogy 2.0
    a.k.a. the Remix
    GLORIA LADSON-BILLINGS
    Critical Culturally Sustaining/Revitalizing Pedagogy and Indigenous Education Sovereignty
    TERESA L. McCARTY and TIFFANY S. LEE

    Book Notes

    Schooling Hip-hop
    Edited by Marc Lamont Hill and Emery Petchauer; foreword by Jeff Chang

    Charter Schools and the Corporate Makeover of Public Education
    By Michael Fabricant & Michelle Fine

    Global Education Policy and International Development
    Edited by Antoni Verger, Mario Novelli, and Hülya Kosar Altinyelken