Harvard Educational Review
  1. Spring 2014 Issue »

    Symposium: Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy

    Nearly two decades ago, Gloria Ladson-Billings (1995) proposed culturally relevant pedagogy, “a theoretical model that not only addresses student achievement but also helps students to accept and affirm their cultural identity while developing critical perspectives that challenge inequities that schools (and other institutions) perpetuate” (p. 469). Culturally relevant pedagogy has not only ignited countless studies, but the theory has also assumed a central role in teacher education, inspiring a generation of teachers to enter the classroom with a renewed commitment to affirming students’ cultural, racial, and ethnic identities.

    As the study of culture in education has exploded in scale, the Harvard Educational Review has been an active and instrumental participant in the conversation (e.g., Cochran-Smith, 1995; Conklin, 2008; and Yosso, Smith, Ceja, & Solorzano, 2009). While this discussion remains vibrant, a great deal has changed since Ladson-Billings first offered her original formulation. Demographic change continues to re-shape student identities, and students themselves continue to reimagine the meanings of those identities. Social scientists and educators, meanwhile, continue to rethink pedagogical theories and practices that best respond to this dynamic reality.

    In this vein of scholarship is culturally sustaining pedagogy, a theoretical stance proposed by Django Paris (2012) that “seeks to perpetuate and foster—to sustain—linguistic, literate, and cultural pluralism as part of the democratic project of schooling” (p. 93). In this symposium, we present the continued development of culturally sustaining pedagogy as a theory for a new century—one that bears the intellectual hallmarks of the work that has preceded it but is also uniquely responsive to the dynamic nature of culture, society, and the lives of young people.

    Culturally sustaining pedagogy is an emergent idea, a still-nascent concept appearing on the pages of this symposium to usher a crucial return to questions of identity and culture that remain central to the lives of young people. We encourage scholars and practitioners to take this work into their studies and classrooms and to use the concept of culturally sustaining pedagogy in ways that will test, hone, and clarify the theory. Whatever new theoretical or empirical findings may result, we look forward to engaging with those ideas on our pages.

    References

    Cochran-Smith, M. (1995). Uncertain allies: Understanding the boundaries of race and teachingHarvard Educational Review, 65(4), 541–­571.

    Conklin, H. G. (2008). Modeling compassion in critical, justice-oriented teacher educationHarvard Educational Review, 78(4), 652­–674.

    Ladson-Billings, G. (1995). Toward a theory of culturally relevant pedagogy. American Educational Research Journal, 32(3), 465–491.

    Paris, D. (2012). Culturally sustaining pedagogy: A needed change in stance, terminology, and practiceEducational Researcher, 41(3), 93–97.

    Yosso, T. J., Smith, W. A., Ceja, M., & Solorzano, D. G. (2009). Critical race theory, racial microaggressions, and campus racial climate for Latina/o undergraduatesHarvard Educational Review, 79(4), 659–691.

    Articles in the Symposium

    Culturally Relevant Pedagogy 2.0: a.k.a. the Remix by Gloria Ladson-Billings

    What Are We Seeking to Sustain Through Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy?: A Loving Critique Forward by Django Paris and H. Samy Alim

    Critical Culturally Sustaining/Revitalizing Pedagogy and Indigenous Education Sovereignty by Teresa L. McCarty and Tiffany S. Lee

     
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    Spring 2014 Issue

    Abstracts

    What Are We Seeking to Sustain Through Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy?
    A Loving Critique Forward
    DJANGO PARIS and H. SAMY ALIM
    “A Slow Revolution”
    Toward a Theory of Intellectual Playfulness in High School Classrooms
    SARAH M. FINE
    Designing Educative Curriculum Materials
    A Theoretically and Empirically Driven Process
    ELIZABETH A. DAVIS, ANNEMARIE SULLIVAN PALINCSAR, ANNA MARIA ARIAS, AMBER SCHULTZ BISMACK, LOREN M. MARULIS, STEFANIE K. IWASHYNA
    Parental Authority over Education and the Right to Invite
    BRYAN R. WARNICK
    Symposium: Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy
    Culturally Relevant Pedagogy 2.0
    a.k.a. the Remix
    GLORIA LADSON-BILLINGS
    Critical Culturally Sustaining/Revitalizing Pedagogy and Indigenous Education Sovereignty
    TERESA L. McCARTY and TIFFANY S. LEE

    Book Notes

    Schooling Hip-hop
    Edited by Marc Lamont Hill and Emery Petchauer; foreword by Jeff Chang

    Charter Schools and the Corporate Makeover of Public Education
    By Michael Fabricant & Michelle Fine

    Global Education Policy and International Development
    Edited by Antoni Verger, Mario Novelli, and Hülya Kosar Altinyelken