Harvard Educational Review
  1. Fall 2014 Issue »

    To Charter or Not to Charter

    What Questions Should We Ask, and What Will the Answers Tell Us?

    HARRY BRIGHOUSE AND GINA SCHOUTEN

    In this essay, Harry Brighouse and Gina Schouten outline four standards for judging whether to support the chartering of a new school within a given jurisdiction. The authors pose the following questions to a hypothetical school board member: Will the school increase equality of opportunity? Will it benefit the least-advantaged students in the jurisdiction? Will it improve the preparation of democratically competent citizens? Will it improve the quality of the daily, lived experience of the students? Brighouse and Schouten suggest that most of the evidence concerning charter school performance focuses on just the students within the schools, without addressing a charter school’s effect on students who do not attend. They argue that a full evaluation requires both kinds of evidence and that these questions are the four standards that should guide both the decision maker and researchers gathering evidence on the effects of charter schools.

    Click here to purchase this article.

    Harry Brighouse is a professor of philosophy at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. His recent research has focused on the ethics of interactions between parents and children, the moral questions concerning school choice, and justice in the distribution of educational opportunities. His books include School Choice and Social Justice (Oxford, 2000), On Education (Routledge, 2006), and, with Adam Swift, Family Values: The Ethics of Parent-Child Relationships (Princeton, 2014).
     

    Gina Schouten is an assistant professor of philosophy at Illinois State University. Her interests include educational justice, political legitimacy, and gender in the family. In her most recent research she has explored the moral foundations of objections to academic achievement gaps, and considered which principles should be included in a theory of educational justice and how the basic structure of society is best conceived of when theorizing about justice. She is currently working on projects concerning the legitimacy of political interventions aimed at altering the gendered division of labor. 

  2. Share

    Fall 2014 Issue

    Abstracts

    Perceiving Learning Anew
    Social Interaction, Dignity, and Educational Rights
    MANUEL luis ESPINOZA AND SHIRIN VOSSOUGHI
    How Do You Say Twos in Spanish, If Two Is Dos?
    Language as Means and Object in a Bilingual Kindergarten Classroom
    NAOMI MULVIHILL
    Tacit Information Literacies in Beginning College Students
    Research Pedagogy in Geography
    NICHOLAS BAUCH AND CHRISTINA SHELDON
    Symposium
    Thinking and Learning
    The Challenge of Holistic Student Support
    Investigating Urban Adolescents’ Constructions of Support in the Context of School
    GRETCHEN BRION-MEISELS
    To Charter or Not to Charter
    What Questions Should We Ask, and What Will the Answers Tell Us?
    HARRY BRIGHOUSE AND GINA SCHOUTEN
    The Author Has the Last Word
    Buddy Editing in a First-Grade Classroom
    JESSIE L. AUGER

    Book Notes

    The Time Is Now
    Louie F. Rodríguez