Harvard Educational Review
  1. Winter 2014 Issue »

    Learning in the Making

    A Comparative Case Study of Three Makerspaces

    KIMBERLY M. SHERIDAN, ERICA ROSENFELD HALVERSON, BREANNE K. LITTS, LISA BRAHMS, LYNETTE JACOBS-PRIEBE, and TREVOR OWENS
    Through a comparative case study, Sheridan and colleagues explore how makerspaces may function as learning environments. Drawing on field observations, interviews, and analysis of artifacts, videos, and other documents, the authors describe features of three makerspaces and how participants learn and develop through complex design and making practices. They describe how the makerspaces help individuals identify problems, build models, learn and apply skills, revise ideas, and share new knowledge with others. The authors conclude with a discussion of the implications of their findings for this emergent field.

    Click here to purchase this article.
    Kimberly M. Sheridan is an associate professor holding a joint appointment in the College of Education and Human Development and the College of Visual and Performing Arts at George Mason University. She studies learning at the intersections of art, science, and new technologies with a particular focus on the sociocultural contexts of learning. She is the recipient of a number of grants and awards, including from the National Science, Fulbright, and Spencer foundations. Sheridan co-directs with Erica Rosenfeld Halverson the Learning in the Making research lab, where they are currently focused on what and how young people learn through making and how new technologies can be leveraged for more inspired and engaged making processes.

    Erica Rosenfeld Halverson is an associate professor of digital media and literacy in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Her work focuses on what it means to learn in and through the arts across a range of contexts, including out-of-school arts organizations, museums, libraries, and arts-based classrooms. In 2010 she received the Jan Hawkins Award for Early Career Contributions to Humanistic Research and Scholarship in Learning Technologies for her research on how filmmaking serves as a vehicle for positive identity development and sophisticated literacy learning for young people who are disaffiliated from school. Halverson codirects with Kimberly Sheridan the Learning in the Making research lab, where they are currently focused on what and how young people learn through making and how new technologies can be leveraged for more inspired and engaged making processes.

    Breanne K. Litts is a doctoral student in curriculum and instruction, with an emphasis in digital media, at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Broadly, her scholarly interests are focused around the intersection of identity, learning, design, and technology, particularly from a learning sciences perspective. She currently serves as a project assistant for Erica Rosenfeld Halverson on a National Science Foundation–funded project studying the relationship between design and learning in Makerspaces and informal learning environments. Additionally, she is the researcher for the Mobile Learning Incubator in Academic Technology at UW-Madison. While completing an MS in curriculum and instruction at UW-Madison, Litts worked with Robert Enright to implement forgiveness (peace) education in a range of contexts and spaces. As part of her research interests, she enjoys exploring the affordances and constraints of mobile learning spaces, specifically in the context of civic education and social justice, such as in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

    Lisa Brahms is the director of learning and research at the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, where her research considers the design of informal learning environments for meaningful participation in creative processes with digital and physical media. She is also a research scientist with the University of Pittsburgh Center for Learning in Out-of-School Environments (UPCLOSE). Brahms has been an educator and designer of formal and informal learning experiences and environments for over a decade, working in schools and at numerous children’s, art, and history museums.

    Lynette Jacobs-Priebe is a research associate at the University of Pittsburgh Center for Learning in Out-of-School Environments (UPCLOSE). She earned her PhD at Vanderbilt University in community research and action.

    Trevor Owens is a digital archivist/historian with the National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program in the Office of Strategic Initiatives at the Library of Congress. His work focuses on digital strategy for cultural heritage organizations, in particular, the preservation of born digital artifacts and tools and practices for making digital and digitized cultural heritage objects accessible and useful to a wide range of audiences. His research has been published in journals such as Curator: The Museum Journal, Digital Humanities Quarterly, and Science Communication. In 2014 he received the Society for American Archivist’s Archival Innovator Award.
  2. Share

    Winter 2014 Issue

    Abstracts

    Toward a Relational Perspective on Young Black and Latino Males
    The Contextual Patterns of Disclosure as Coping
    David J. Knight
    The Kinesiology of Race
    MYOSHA McAFEE
    The Maker Movement in Education
    ERICA ROSENFELD HALVERSON and KIMBERLY M. SHERIDAN
    Learning in the Making
    A Comparative Case Study of Three Makerspaces
    KIMBERLY M. SHERIDAN, ERICA ROSENFELD HALVERSON, BREANNE K. LITTS, LISA BRAHMS, LYNETTE JACOBS-PRIEBE, and TREVOR OWENS
    Electronic Textiles as Disruptive Designs
    Supporting and Challenging Maker Activities in Schools
    YASMIN B. KAFAI, DEBORAH A. FIELDS, AND KRISTIN A. SEARLE
    Symposium
    The Maker Movement in Education: Designing, Creating, and Learning Across Contexts

    Book Notes

    How College Works
    Daniel F. Chambliss and Christopher G. Takacs

    The States of Child Care
    Sara Gable