Harvard Educational Review
  1. Winter 2014 Issue »

    Toward a Relational Perspective on Young Black and Latino Males

    The Contextual Patterns of Disclosure as Coping

    David J. Knight
    In this article, David J. Knight investigates where and when Black and Latino male adolescents engage in self-disclosure—sharing their emotions, thoughts, and social perceptions—with their peers. Building from asset-based research and ecological theories of development, Knight analyzes in-depth interviews and finds that these adolescents may consider context in their decisions regarding whether or not to disclose to peers. Participants who reported disclosing behaviors tended to do so outside of school settings, while those who did not report disclosure discussed how experiences with community violence contributed to their decision not to share their feelings. Knight discusses the implications of this work for practitioners who hope to provide safe educational settings for young men of color.

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    David J. Knight is an independent scholar and educator in Boston. An associated researcher with the Justice in Schools Project at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, he focuses his research on uncovering underacknowledged modes of coping and competence among urban adolescent populations, particularly African American and Latino male youth. In particular, his scholarly interests include the intersections of race, gender, and class in urban schools and neighborhoods; restorative justice practices in secondary schools; and teaching for equity and social justice. Recently, he contributed to an empirical investigation within the McArthur Foundation Research Network on Youth and Participatory Politics. He is the coauthor with Anita Wadhwa of “Expanding Opportunity through Critical Restorative Justice: Portraits of Resilience at the Individual and School Level” (Schools: Studies in Education, 2014), and his research and commentary have also appeared in the Washington Post, Education Week, Teaching Tolerance, and in online publications by the Black Youth Project. He has taught and worked with young people across a wide range of settings, including urban and rural areas in the United States as well as in Cape Town, South Africa, and the Dominican Republic.
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    Winter 2014 Issue

    Abstracts

    Toward a Relational Perspective on Young Black and Latino Males
    The Contextual Patterns of Disclosure as Coping
    David J. Knight
    The Kinesiology of Race
    MYOSHA McAFEE
    The Maker Movement in Education
    ERICA ROSENFELD HALVERSON and KIMBERLY M. SHERIDAN
    Learning in the Making
    A Comparative Case Study of Three Makerspaces
    KIMBERLY M. SHERIDAN, ERICA ROSENFELD HALVERSON, BREANNE K. LITTS, LISA BRAHMS, LYNETTE JACOBS-PRIEBE, and TREVOR OWENS
    Electronic Textiles as Disruptive Designs
    Supporting and Challenging Maker Activities in Schools
    YASMIN B. KAFAI, DEBORAH A. FIELDS, AND KRISTIN A. SEARLE
    Symposium
    The Maker Movement in Education: Designing, Creating, and Learning Across Contexts

    Book Notes

    How College Works
    Daniel F. Chambliss and Christopher G. Takacs

    The States of Child Care
    Sara Gable