Harvard Educational Review
  1. Fall 2015 Issue »

    The Art of Unlearning

    CLINT SMITH
    My students are hope unhinged.

    They don’t allow checkpoints to define
    where or how they deserve to live.
    They have made our classroom

    an asylum from the inhumane,
    a refuge from the things
    that have rendered

    their feet unworthy of this soil.
    I bear witness
    to their brilliance, but watch

    the world try to confine them
    to connotation. How it slings words
    at them to suggest that their breath

    is criminal, deserving of dust.
    How it often does the same to me.
    My black skin, their brown bodies;

    our histories wrought with misconception.

    We reimagine pedagogy to be
    the art of unlearning.
    Take all that we have been told

    about this country and search
    for the omissions in our textbooks.
    How the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo

    took half a million miles
    and rewrote a history cast aside.
    The way Manifest Destiny made

    a masquerade of brown skin. How
    it skews the way we contemplate
    the antiquity of this melanin.

    We pick up our pens,
    reclaim a humanity
    that was stolen.

    Poems imbued with love,
    memoirs laden with fear,
    stories of worlds we have yet to build.

    We write unapologetically.
    We recalibrate indignity.
    We document the world

    ourselves.
    Clint Smith is a teacher, poet, and doctoral candidate in Education at Harvard University with a concentration in Culture, Institutions, and Society. He is a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow with research interests centered on race, inequality, and incarceration. He is a 2014 National Poetry Slam champion and was a speaker at the 2015 TED Conference. His writing has been published or is forthcoming in The Guardian, Kinfolks, American Literary Review, Still: The Journal, Off the Coast, Mason’s Road, and elsewhere. Before beginning his doctorate, he taught high school English in Prince George’s County, Maryland, where he was named the 2013 Christine D. Sarbanes Teacher of the Year by the Maryland Humanities Council. He was born and raised in New Orleans, Louisiana.
  2. Share

    Fall 2015 Issue

    Abstracts

    “Diles la verdad”
    Deportation Policies, Politicized Funds of Knowledge, and Schooling in Middle Childhood
    SARAH GALLO AND HOLLY LINK
    “My Student Was Apprehended by Immigration”
    A Civics Teacher’s Breach of Silence in a Mixed-Citizenship Classroom
    DAFNEY BLANCA DABACH
    The Art of Unlearning
    CLINT SMITH
    On the Grammar of Silence
    The Structure of My Undocumented Immigrant Writer’s Block
    ALBERTO LEDESMA
    Undocumented Undergraduates on College Campuses
    Understanding Their Challenges and Assets and What It Takes to Make an Undocufriendly Campus
    CAROLA SUÁREZ-OROZCO, DALAL KATSIAFICAS, OLIVIA BIRCHALL, CYNTHIA M. ALCANTAR, EDWIN HERNANDEZ, YULIANA GARCIA, MINAS MICHIKYAN, JANET CERDA, ROBERT T. TERANISHI
    UC Berkeley’s Undocumented Student Program
    Holistic Strategies for Undocumented Student Equitable Success Across Higher Education
    RUBEN ELIAS CANEDO SANCHEZ AND MENG L. SO
    Undocumented Status and Schooling for Newcomer Teens
    ELAINE C. ALLARD
    Editor's Review
    STEPHANY CUEVAS
    Afterword
    Imagined Futures
    ROBERTO G. GONZALES
    Foreword
    Human Rights for Undocumented Students and Their Families
    MARY C. WATERS
    Editors' Introduction
    Dissolving Boundaries: Understanding Undocumented Students’ Educational Experiences
    Untangling Plyler’s Legacy
    Undocumented Students, Schools, and Citizenship
    ROBERTO G. GONZALES, LUISA L. HEREDIA, GENEVIEVE NEGRÓN-GONZALES
    The Unlikelihood of Family
    A Photographic Essay on Transnational Experiences
    CRISTINA LLERENA NAVARRO

    Book Notes

    Everyday Illegal
    Joanna Dreby