Harvard Educational Review
  1. Winter 2015 Issue »

    The Risks We Are Willing to Take

    Youth Civic Development in “Postwar” Guatemala

    MICHELLE J. BELLINO
    In this article, Michelle J. Bellino explores contrasting approaches to civic education in two rural schools serving indigenous Maya youth in post–civil war Guatemala. Through comparative ethnography, she examines how youth civic pathways intersect with legacies of authoritarianism while young people shape their identity as members of historically oppressed groups. She suggests that student decisions about how and when to participate in civic issues function as a risk calculus, taking into consideration the costs and benefits of both participation and nonparticipation as well as the civic obligation to abstain or join communities in struggle. Although serving similarly impoverished communities hard-hit by state actors during the war and now struggling with issues of indigenous autonomy, both schools position daily experiences with injustice as an entry point for constructing youth citizenship. Beyond this shared experience of historical injustice and its ongoing effects, educators envision young peoples’ roles according to different risk structures. In this way, youth construct civic pathways while traversing between the potential for risk and reward, in part informed by their experiences in school. 

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    Michelle J. Bellino is an assistant professor at the University of Michigan School of Education, where she studies young people’s understanding of historical injustice, particularly in conflict-affected and postconflict contexts. Her work, which explores how young people construct the past while shaping an evolving sense of themselves as local and global civic actors, has been featured in Education, Citizenship, and Social Justice and the International Journal of History Teaching, Learning, and Research and is forthcoming in the Comparative Education Review. Bellino has been selected as a Peace Scholar by the US Institute of Peace; a Concha Delgado Gaitan Presidential Fellow by the Council of Anthropology and Education; and a Gail P. Kelly Dissertation Award recipient by the Comparative and International Education Society for her work on educational equity and social justice in international contexts. 
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    Winter 2015 Issue

    Abstracts

    The Risks We Are Willing to Take
    Youth Civic Development in “Postwar” Guatemala
    MICHELLE J. BELLINO
    Cultural Capital and Transnational Parenting
    The Case of Ghanaian Migrants in the United States
    CATI COE AND SERAH SHANI
    Toward Disciplinary Literacy
    Dilemmas and Challenges in Designing History Curriculum to Support Middle School Students
    LESLIE DUHAYLONGSOD, CATHERINE E. SNOW, ROBERT L. SELMAN, AND M. SUZANNE DONOVAN
    The Shaping of Postcollege Colorblind Orientation Among Whites
    Residential Segregation and Campus Diversity Experiences
    UMA M. JAYAKUMAR
    Black Male College Achievers and Resistant Responses to Racist Stereotypes at Predominantly White Colleges and Universities
    SHAUN R. HARPER

    Book Notes

    Learning to Improve
    Anthony S. Bryk, Louis M. Gomez, Alicia Grunow, and Paul G. LeMahieu

    How Did You Get Here?
    Thomas Hehir and Laura A. Schifter