Harvard Educational Review
  1. Summer 2016 Issue »

    Changing the Place of Teacher Education

    Feminism, Fear, and Pedagogical Paradoxes

    STEPHANIE JONES and HILARY E. HUGHES
    In this article, Stephanie Jones and Hilary E. Hughes suggest that particular discursive lessons are readily available in justice-oriented teacher education which might influence a pedagogy that crowds out responsiveness, the experience of the student, and the role of gender and feminism in teacher education. They contend that changing the place of teacher education to include unpredictable community settings requires pedagogical responses that defy predictable storylines and ready-made discursive lessons common in teacher education. The lessons learned contribute to justice-oriented teacher education and an emerging trend for including community-based experiences in teacher education, and highlight the importance of feminist storylines for the incommensurability of misogyny and racism for teacher education. 

    Click here to access this article. 
    Stephanie Jones is a Josiah Meigs Distinguished Teaching Professor at the University of Georgia in the Department of Educational Theory and Practice. She teaches courses on ethnography and place-based teaching, feminist theory and pedagogy, social class and poverty, early childhood education, and literacy. Her scholarship on the intersections of literacy, social class, gender, and pedagogy has been published in journals such as the Anthropology and Education Quarterly, Educational Researcher, Gender and Education, Journal of Teacher Education, and Reading Research Quarterly. Pieces from her five-year collaborative graphica project with James F. Woglom have been published in the Harvard Educational Review, Teachers College Record, and Phi Beta Kappan, as well as in edited volumes on justice-oriented teacher education and research methodologies. Jones is the author of Girls, Social Class and Literacy: What Teachers Can Do to Make a Difference (2006, Heinemann); editor of Writing and Teaching to Change the World: Connecting with Our Most Vulnerable Students (2014, National Writing Project); and coauthor with James F. Woglom of a forthcoming graphica book tentatively titled Drawing Change in Teacher Education.

    Hilary E. Hughes is an assistant professor of middle grades education in the Department of Educational Theory and Practice at the University of Georgia. Her research and teaching interests include feminist, justice-oriented teacher education; youth studies; theories of the body and embodied teaching practices in middle grades education, teacher education, and doctoral education; and phenomenology as a philosophy and methodology. Her work has been published in journals such as Journal of Teacher Education, Qualitative Inquiry, International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, International Review of Qualitative Research, Field Methods, English Teaching: Practice and Critique, Middle Grades Review, and Middle School Journal
  2. Share

    Summer 2016 Issue

    Abstracts

    Changing the Place of Teacher Education
    Feminism, Fear, and Pedagogical Paradoxes
    STEPHANIE JONES and HILARY E. HUGHES
    “Get an Education in Case He Leaves You”
    Consejos for Mexican American Women PhDs
    MICHELLE M. ESPINO
    Making Through the Lens of Culture and Power
    Toward Transformative Visions for Educational Equity
    SHIRIN VOSSOUGHI, PAULA K. HOOPER, and MEG ESCUDÉ
    The Formation of Community-Engaged Scholars
    A Collaborative Approach to Doctoral Training in Education Research
    MARK R. WARREN, SOOJIN OH PARK, and MARA CASEY TIEKEN
    The Dilemma of Care
    A Theory and Praxis of Citizenship-Based Care for China’s Rural Migrant Youth
    LISA YIU
    Editor's Review
    SHAUNA BROWN LEUNG

    Book Notes