Harvard Educational Review
  1. Summer 2016 Issue »

    The Dilemma of Care

    A Theory and Praxis of Citizenship-Based Care for China’s Rural Migrant Youth

    LISA YIU
    In this article, Lisa Yiu examines how migrant students attending public schools in Shanghai perceive teachers as uncaring and how the majority of teachers claim they are disempowered from caring. She contends that recent Shanghai reforms, which aim to “care” for migrant youth through inclusion into public schools, may be having the opposite effect, arguing that the nature of contact between educators and migrant youth is structured by conflicting state policies on citizenship, which constrain teachers from caring in the way migrant students desire. Yiu’s findings problematize recent scholarship on migrant children’s schooling which presumes that the dynamics of exclusion are primarily rooted in teacher prejudices. Importantly, this study advances caring theory by reconceptualizing care within the institutional context of the state’s citizenship policies and contributes to a citizenship-based care praxis that is relevant to Chinese migrant youth who attend public schools. 

    Click here to access this article. 
    Lisa Yiu is a visiting scholar at the Stanford Graduate School of Education. Her research, which applies sociological theory to examine education’s role in the integration of migrant and disadvantaged youth into Chinese society, has appeared in the China Quarterly. Her two current projects draw from this HER article’s ethnographic study. The first project investigates the extent to which and ways in which China’s urban public schools provide fewer learning opportunities to rural migrant youth compared to urban students. Her second project is writing children’s books (in Mandarin) that will give hope and build resiliency among China’s rural migrant youth. Drawing inspiration from the rural migrant children identified in Yiu’s study, the books tell the story of a rural Chinese migrant family’s urban integration successes and migration challenges. Yiu’s work is motivated and critically enriched by her experiences as an inner-city teacher in the Los Angeles Unified School District and as an English as a Second Language teacher in China.


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    Summer 2016 Issue

    Abstracts

    Changing the Place of Teacher Education
    Feminism, Fear, and Pedagogical Paradoxes
    STEPHANIE JONES and HILARY E. HUGHES
    “Get an Education in Case He Leaves You”
    Consejos for Mexican American Women PhDs
    MICHELLE M. ESPINO
    Making Through the Lens of Culture and Power
    Toward Transformative Visions for Educational Equity
    SHIRIN VOSSOUGHI, PAULA K. HOOPER, and MEG ESCUDÉ
    The Formation of Community-Engaged Scholars
    A Collaborative Approach to Doctoral Training in Education Research
    MARK R. WARREN, SOOJIN OH PARK, and MARA CASEY TIEKEN
    The Dilemma of Care
    A Theory and Praxis of Citizenship-Based Care for China’s Rural Migrant Youth
    LISA YIU
    Editor's Review
    SHAUNA BROWN LEUNG

    Book Notes