Harvard Educational Review
  1. Summer 2016 Issue »

    The Formation of Community-Engaged Scholars

    A Collaborative Approach to Doctoral Training in Education Research

    MARK R. WARREN, SOOJIN OH PARK, and MARA CASEY TIEKEN
    In this article, Mark R. Warren, Soojin Oh Park, and Mara Casey Tieken explore the training and development of community-engaged scholars in doctoral programs in education. Community-engaged scholars working in the field of education collaborate with families, teachers, and communities to support their efforts to address educational inequities, marking an important way that researchers can promote social justice in public education. Yet these collaborations require particular skills and orientations of researchers, which traditional models of doctoral education are not designed to develop. Additionally, much less attention has been paid to the process of training and equipping emerging community-engaged researchers. This article presents the findings of a self-study of a research project designed to build among doctoral students the skills, dispositions, and commitments of community-engaged scholarship. The authors argue that by fostering collaborative learning and creating a community that embraces project members’ whole selves, students learn to tell their stories, build “horizontal” research relationships, question their researcher positionalities, and develop identities as community-engaged scholars. One of the few in-depth investigations of doctoral practices that support community-engaged scholarship, this study offers critical lessons for those who care about the development of a new generation of education researchers committed to working with communities to transform schools and society. 

    Click here to access this article. 
    Mark R. Warren is an associate professor of public policy and public affairs at the University of Massachusetts Boston. He is a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellow and a fellow of the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research at Harvard University. Warren studies and works with community and youth organizing groups seeking to promote equity and justice in education, community development, and American democratic life. He is the author of Dry Bones Rattling: Community Building to Revitalize American Democracy (Princeton University Press, 2001), Fire in the Heart: How White Activists Embrace Racial Justice (Oxford University Press, 2010), A Match on Dry Grass: Community Organizing as a Catalyst for School Reform (Oxford University Press, 2011), and Transforming Public Education: The Need for an Educational Justice Movement (New England Journal of Public Policy, 2014). Warren is a national cochair of the Urban Research-Based Action Network.

    Soojin Oh Park is an assistant professor in the Early Childhood and Family Studies program and an affiliate faculty of the Learning Sciences and Human Development and the Education, Equity, and Society programs at the University of Washington College of Education. Her work seeks to inform public policies and educational practices that address systematic inequalities of early learning opportunities among children from low-income families and immigrant communities. Park’s research draws on transdisciplinary perspectives in psychology, sociology, and public policy and employs both quantitative and qualitative methods to focus on questions of why certain early childhood policies and programs effectively promote children’s learning and others do not. Additionally, her research considers how family socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, and immigration contribute to differential patterns of parental investments in early learning and their effects on children’s cognitive and language outcomes.

    Mara Casey Tieken is an assistant professor of education at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine. Her research focuses on racial and educational equity in rural schools and communities. Her book Why Rural Schools Matter (University of North Carolina Press, 2014), an ethnographic study of two rural southern communities, examines how rural schools define and sustain their surrounding communities. Tieken is currently working on a multiyear project, supported by a grant from the Spencer Foundation, that explores the college aspirations, transitions, and persistence of rural, first-generation students. She also studies community organizing for education reform and works with the Annenberg Institute for School Reform, where she supports organizing efforts in rural New England. Before receiving her doctorate from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, Tieken taught elementary school in rural Tennessee. 




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    Summer 2016 Issue

    Abstracts

    Changing the Place of Teacher Education
    Feminism, Fear, and Pedagogical Paradoxes
    STEPHANIE JONES and HILARY E. HUGHES
    “Get an Education in Case He Leaves You”
    Consejos for Mexican American Women PhDs
    MICHELLE M. ESPINO
    Making Through the Lens of Culture and Power
    Toward Transformative Visions for Educational Equity
    SHIRIN VOSSOUGHI, PAULA K. HOOPER, and MEG ESCUDÉ
    The Formation of Community-Engaged Scholars
    A Collaborative Approach to Doctoral Training in Education Research
    MARK R. WARREN, SOOJIN OH PARK, and MARA CASEY TIEKEN
    The Dilemma of Care
    A Theory and Praxis of Citizenship-Based Care for China’s Rural Migrant Youth
    LISA YIU
    Editor's Review
    SHAUNA BROWN LEUNG

    Book Notes