Harvard Educational Review
  1. Spring 2017 Issue »

    Responding to “Cross-Pollinating Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy and Universal Design for Learning: Toward an Inclusive Pedagogy That Accounts for Dis/Ability”

    A HARVARD EDUCATIONAL REVIEW FORUM

    H. SAMY ALIM, SUSAN BAGLIERI, GLORIA LADSON-BILLINGS, DAVID H. ROSE, DJANGO PARIS, and JOSEPH MICHAEL VALENTE
    In the fall of 2016, the Harvard Educational Review (HER) published “Cross-Pollinating Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy and Universal Design for Learning: Toward an Inclusive Pedagogy that Accounts for Dis/Ability” by Federico R. Waitoller, assistant professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and Kathleen A. King Thorius, associate professor of special education at Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis. In that article, the authors call for scholars of culturally sustaining pedagogy (CSP) to join with dis/abilities scholars in their work. Through a “loving critique” of both CSP and universal design for learning (UDL), Waitoller and Thorius aim to show how these two pedagogical approaches go far, each in its own way, in their attempts at creating meaningful learning opportunities for different kinds of learners, but that each could benefit from cross-pollination. They contend scholars and practitioners must focus on intersecting forms of oppression, including those that tacitly or explicitly condone either racism or ableism.
     
    Waitoller and Thorius’s article was not the starting point for many of these ideas, nor, luckily, will it be the end. In their article, the authors explicitly refer to the spring 2014 HER symposium on culturally sustaining pedagogy (Editors, 2014; Ladson-Billings, 2014; McCarty & Lee, 2014; Paris & Alim, 2014). Since HER has long sought to be a forum for important topics in education, particularly those that challenge the field to promote greater justice in schools, the editors saw an opportunity to continue the conversation by inviting not only several of the authors from the 2014 symposium on CSP but also additional scholars at the vanguard of work on UDL to offer their reflections on Waitoller and Thorius’s main provocation: “recognition and value of all student differences” (p. 384).
     
    As such, HER convened six scholars for a moderated virtual discussion to respond to Waitoller and Thorius’s article. Participants included H. Samy Alim, professor of education and, by courtesy, anthropology and linguistics at Stanford University; Susan Baglieri, associate professor of special education at Montclair State University; Gloria Ladson-Billings, Kellner Family Chair in Urban Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the School of Education of the University of Wisconsin–Madison; Django Paris, associate professor of language and literacy in the Department of Teacher Education at Michigan State University; David H. Rose, chief education officer at CAST and a lecturer on education in the Technology, Innovation, and Education Program at the Harvard Graduate School of Education; and Joseph Michael Valente, assistant professor of early childhood education at Pennsylvania State University. HER editor Lauren Yoshizawa prepared guiding questions for participants to review in advance of this forum, and editors E. B. O’Donnell and Stuti Shukla facilitated the discussion. The ninety-minute forum was digitally recorded and later transcribed; the edited transcript is presented here. 

    Click here to access this article.
    H. Samy Alim directs the Center for Race, Ethnicity, and Language at Stanford University, where he also served as founding director of the Race, Inequality, and Language in Education program. His most recent books are Raciolinguistics (Oxford University Press, 2016, with John Rickford and Arnetha Ball) and Culturally Sustaining Pedagogies (Teachers College Press, forthcoming in 2017, with Django Paris).

    Susan Baglieri is an associate professor in the Department of Secondary and Special Education at Montclair State University. Her research interests include disability studies, inclusive education, and teacher education. She is coauthor of Disability Studies and the Inclusive Classroom (Routledge, 2012, with Arthur Shapiro). Her current projects focus on universal design in education, inclusive postsecondary education, and democratic free schools.

    Gloria Ladson-Billings is the Kellner Family Distinguished Chair in Urban Education at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, where she is also a faculty member in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction and a faculty affiliate in the departments of Educational Policy Studies, Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, and Afro-American Studies.

    David H. Rose is a founder and director of CAST, a not-for-profit educational research and development organization where the framework and practices of universal design for learning have been developed. A lifelong educator, Rose has taught in Harvard’s Graduate School of Education for over three decades. 

    Django Paris is an associate professor of language and literacy in the Department of Teacher Education at Michigan State University. His teaching and research focus on understanding and sustaining languages, literacies, and lifeways among youth and communities of color in the context of demographic and social change.

    Joseph Michael Valente is an assistant professor of early childhood education at The Pennsylvania State University. He was the co-principal investigator of the video ethnographic study Kindergartens for the Deaf in Three Countries: Japan, France, and the United States (2010–2013, with Joseph Tobin and Thomas Horejes), funded by The Spencer Foundation, and is the author of the research novel d/Deaf and d/Dumb: A Portrait of a Deaf Kid as a Young Superhero (Peter Lang, 2011).

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    Spring 2017 Issue

    Abstracts

    Responding to “Cross-Pollinating Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy and Universal Design for Learning: Toward an Inclusive Pedagogy That Accounts for Dis/Ability”
    A HARVARD EDUCATIONAL REVIEW FORUM
    H. SAMY ALIM, SUSAN BAGLIERI, GLORIA LADSON-BILLINGS, DAVID H. ROSE, DJANGO PARIS, and JOSEPH MICHAEL VALENTE
    Where Are All the Black Teachers?
    Discrimination in the Teacher Labor Market
    DIANA D’AMICO, ROBERT J. PAWLEWICZ, PENELOPE M. EARLEY, and ADAM P. MCGEEHAN
    Putting Race on the Table
    How Teachers Make Sense of the Role of Race in Their Practice
    AMANDA J. TAYLOR
    A Crime for a Crime?
    The Landscape of Correctional Education in the United States
    LYNETTE N. TANNIS
    Complex Sentences
    Searching for the Purpose of Education Inside a Massachusetts State Prison
    CLINT SMITH
    Critiquing Critical Pedagogies Inside the Prison Classroom
    A Dialogue Between Student and Teacher
    ERIN L. CASTRO and MICHAEL BRAWN
    The Problem Child
    Provocations Toward Dismantling the Carceral State
    ERICA R. MEINERS
    Harvard Educational Review’s Commitment to Justice and Equity at a Time of Political and Social Change
    From the Editors

    Book Notes

    Continuity in Children’s Worlds
    Melissa M. Jozwiak, Betsy J. Cahill, and Rachel Theilheimer

    An Everyone Culture
    Robert Kegan and Lisa Lahey, with Matthew L. Miller, Andy Fleming, and Deborah Helsing