Harvard Educational Review
  1. Fall 2017 Issue »

    Globalizing Literature Pedagogy

    Applying Cosmopolitan Ethical Criticism to the Teaching of Literature

    SUZANNE S. CHOO
    With global risks such as terrorism, fundamentalism, and xenophobia per-meating our everyday consciousness, there is a pressing need for educators to cultivate in their students a cosmopolitan hospitality toward multiple and marginalized others in the world. Yet, despite growing interest in ethics among literary scholars, theorizations of ethical criticism are predominantly observed among scholars working in university settings rather than at high schools, and major scholarly texts on ethical criticism focus on literary texts that provoke ethical responses rather than on pedagogical strategies. In this essay, Suzanne Choo aims to address these two gaps by arguing that cosmopolitan ethical criticism should be a core feature of literature pedagogy in schools and by describing its potential for developing students as global ethical thinkers. The article situates cosmopolitan ethical criticism by distinguishing it from two other disciplinary practices, aesthetic criticism and didactic ethical criticism. It goes on to describe what cosmopolitan ethical criticism may look like in the classroom by examining pedagogical approaches to teaching literature employed by four high school teachers in Australia, Singapore, and the United States.

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    Suzanne S. Choo is an assistant professor at the National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Her research interests lie in issues related to education for global and cosmopolitan citizenship, particularly in relation to literature education, and her work has been published in various peer-reviewed journals, including Research in the Teaching of English, Curriculum Inquiry, Journal of Aesthetic Education, and Journal of Curriculum Studies. In 2011 Choo was awarded the International Award for Excellence by the International Journal of the Humanities and the Walter M. Sindlinger Writing Award by Teachers College, Columbia University. Her book Reading the World, the Globe, and the Cosmos: Approaches to Teaching Literature for the Twenty-First Century (Peter Lang, 2013) was awarded the 2014 Critics Choice Book Award by the American Educational Studies Association. She coedited (with Deb Sawch, Alison Villanueva, and Ruth Vinz) Educating for the 21st Century: Perspectives, Policies and Practices from Around the World (Springer, 2017), which examines how schools in various countries around the world equip their students for a globalized future. 
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    Fall 2017 Issue

    Abstracts

    How the Word Gap Argument Negatively Impacts Young Children of Latinx Immigrants’ Conceptualizations of Learning
    JENNIFER KEYS ADAIR, KIYOMI SÁNCHEZ-SUZUKI COLEGROVE, and MOLLY E. MCMANUS
    Globalizing Literature Pedagogy
    Applying Cosmopolitan Ethical Criticism to the Teaching of Literature
    SUZANNE S. CHOO
    The Politics of Recitation
    Ideology, Interpellation, and Hegemony
    DAVID I. BACKER
    In Search of Community
    Lessons from Idealized Independence for Adults with Disabilities
    AMY L. BOELÉ
    Teaching Minoritized Students
    Are Additive Approaches Legitimate
    JIM CUMMINS
    Why Education Practitioners and Stakeholders Should Care About Person Fit in Educational Assessments
    A. ADRIENNE WALKER

    Book Notes

    Achieving Coherence in District Improvement
    Susan Moore Johnson, Geoff Marietta, Monica C. Higgins, Karen L. Mapp, and Allen Grossman

    The Privatization of Education
    Antoni Verger, Clara Fontdevila, and Adrián Zancajo