Harvard Educational Review
  1. Fall 2017 Issue »

    Teaching Minoritized Students

    Are Additive Approaches Legitimate

    JIM CUMMINS
    The emergence in recent years of heteroglossic conceptions of bi/multilingualism and the related construct of translanguaging has raised questions about how these notions relate to more traditional conceptions of additive bilingualism, biliteracy, and the overall academic achievement of minoritized students. In this article, Jim Cummins provides a critical examination of both additive bilingualism and additive approaches to language education to clarify the nature of these constructs and to elucidate their instructional implications. He proposes a synthesis of perspectives that replaces the term additive bilingualism with active bilingualism, that acknowledges the dynamic nature of bilingual and multilingual language practices and the instructional implications of this conceptualization, and that insists that education initiatives designed to promote academic achievement among minoritized students can claim empirical legitimacy only when they explicitly challenge raciolinguistic ideologies and, more generally, coercive relations of power.

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    Jim Cummins is Professor Emeritus at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto and an adjunct professor at Åbo Akademi University in Finland. His research focuses on literacy development in education contexts characterized by linguistic diversity. In numerous articles and books he has explored the nature of language proficiency and its relationship to literacy development with particular emphasis on the intersections of societal power relations, teacher-student identity negotiation, and literacy attainment. Cummins is the author of Language, Power and Pedagogy: Bilingual Children in the Crossfire (Multilingual Matters, 2000) and coauthor (with Margaret Early) of Identity Texts: The Collaborative Creation of Power in Multilingual Schools (Trentham Books, 2011).
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    Fall 2017 Issue

    Abstracts

    How the Word Gap Argument Negatively Impacts Young Children of Latinx Immigrants’ Conceptualizations of Learning
    JENNIFER KEYS ADAIR, KIYOMI SÁNCHEZ-SUZUKI COLEGROVE, and MOLLY E. MCMANUS
    Globalizing Literature Pedagogy
    Applying Cosmopolitan Ethical Criticism to the Teaching of Literature
    SUZANNE S. CHOO
    The Politics of Recitation
    Ideology, Interpellation, and Hegemony
    DAVID I. BACKER
    In Search of Community
    Lessons from Idealized Independence for Adults with Disabilities
    AMY L. BOELÉ
    Teaching Minoritized Students
    Are Additive Approaches Legitimate
    JIM CUMMINS
    Why Education Practitioners and Stakeholders Should Care About Person Fit in Educational Assessments
    A. ADRIENNE WALKER

    Book Notes

    Achieving Coherence in District Improvement
    Susan Moore Johnson, Geoff Marietta, Monica C. Higgins, Karen L. Mapp, and Allen Grossman

    The Privatization of Education
    Antoni Verger, Clara Fontdevila, and Adrián Zancajo