Harvard Educational Review
  1. Spring 2018 Issue »

    Risky Business

    An Integrated Institutional Theory for Understanding High-Risk Decision Making in Higher Education

    LAUREN A. TURNER and A. J. ANGULO

    Lauren A. Turner and A. J. Angulo explore how institutional theory can be applied to explain variance in higher education organizational strategies. Given strong regulatory, normative, and cultural-cognitive pressures to conform, they ask, why do some colleges engage in high-risk decision making? To answer this, they bring together classic and contemporary approaches to institutional theory and propose an integrated model for understanding outlier higher education strategies. The integrated model offers a heuristic for analyzing external and internal pressures that motivate colleges to implement nontraditional strategies. Through an analysis of recent trends among outlier colleges and their approaches to the Scholastic Aptitude Test, Turner and Angulo contextualize the model and consider its potential for understanding why higher education organizations adopt characteristics that differentiate them from their peers.

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    Lauren A. Turner is the senior associate vice chancellor for Human Resources and Organizational Strategy and Effectiveness at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. She has spent more than thirty years in a variety of leadership positions in human resources at Mount Holyoke College and UMass Lowell. Her current responsibilities involve oversight of all aspects of campus human resources management, including talent management, employee and labor relations, diversity and inclusion, position classification and total compensation, workplace learning and development, and organizational strategy, effectiveness, and compliance. Turner is also a PhD candidate in leadership and organizational studies in the Manning School of Business at UMass Lowell. Her dissertation explores the effects of leader cultural intelligence on the establishment of diversity management practices in higher education institutions.

    A. J. Angulo is a professor of education and a faculty affiliate in the Department of History and Global Studies Program at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. His book projects include Miseducation (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2016), Diploma Mills (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2016), Empire and Education (Palgrave, 2012), and William Barton Rogers and the Idea of MIT (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009). He also serves as principal investigator, executive director, and academic coordinator of federal grant programs designed to promote international higher education initiatives and increase educational capacity around the world.

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    Spring 2018 Issue

    Abstracts

    Knowledge Citizens?
    Intellectual Disability and the Production of Social Meanings Within Educational Research
    ASHLEY TAYLOR
    Ethics, Identity, and Political Vision
    Toward a Justice-Centered Approach to Equity in Computer Science Education
    SEPEHR VAKIL
    Risky Business
    An Integrated Institutional Theory for Understanding High-Risk Decision Making in Higher Education
    LAUREN A. TURNER and A. J. ANGULO
    My Future, My Family, My Freedom
    Meanings of Schooling for Poor, Rural Chinese Youth
    XIN XIANG
    Teaching in the Restorative Window
    Authenticity, Conviction, and Critical-Restorative Pedagogy in the Work of One Teacher-Leader
    SARAH M. FINE

    Book Notes