Harvard Educational Review
  1. Summer 2015 Issue »

    Doing and Teaching Disciplinary Literacy with Adolescent Learners

    A Social and Cultural Enterprise

    ELIZABETH BIRR MOJE
    In this essay, Elizabeth Birr Moje argues that educators can make radical change in student learning and well-being if they reframe teachers’ work with youth as less about meeting standards and more about teaching youth to navigate the multiple literacy contexts in which they live, learn, and work. To that end, Moje offers a take on disciplinary literacy instruction that puts the process of inquiry at its center. In contrast to a frame that ignores or removes value, purpose, affect, emotion, imagination, social interaction, and the learning and challenging of cultural conventions from the work of adolescent literacy teaching, she presents a teaching heuristic designed to capitalize on the social and cultural nature of disciplinary inquiry and support students in navigating multiple literacy contexts as part of the teaching of disciplinary literacy, characterized by what she terms the 4Es: engage, elicit/engineer, examine, and evaluate.

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    Elizabeth Birr Moje is associate dean for Research and Community Engagement and an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor in the School of Education at the University of Michigan, where she also serves as a faculty associate in the Institute for Social Research and in Latino/a studies. Her work, which examines the intersection between the disciplinary literacies of school and the literacy practices of youth outside of school, has been published in books and in journals such as the Science, Harvard Educational Review, Review of Research in Education, Reading Research Quarterly, Teachers College Record, Phi Delta Kappan, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, and Science Education. Moje’s research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, William T. Grant Foundation, the National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.
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    Summer 2015 Issue

    Abstracts

    Undoing Appropriateness
    Raciolinguistic Ideologies and Language Diversity in Education
    NELSON FLORES and JONATHAN ROSA
    Occupational Control in Education
    The Logic and Leverage of Epistemic Communities
    JOSHUA L. GLAZER and DONALD J. PEURACH
    Moral Injury and the Ethics of Educational Injustice
    MEIRA LEVINSON
    Geographies of Indigenous Leaders
    Landscapes and Mindscapes in the Pacific Northwest
    MICHAEL MARKER
    Doing and Teaching Disciplinary Literacy with Adolescent Learners
    A Social and Cultural Enterprise
    ELIZABETH BIRR MOJE

    Book Notes

    How to Innovate
    Mary Moss Brown and Alisa Berger

    Inspiring Teaching
    Sharon Feiman-Nemser, Eran Tamir, and Karen Hammerness