Harvard Educational Review
  1. Summer 2015 Issue »

    Geographies of Indigenous Leaders

    Landscapes and Mindscapes in the Pacific Northwest

    MICHAEL MARKER
    This essay features three stories of “place-based” leadership in two Indigenous communities in the Pacific Northwest. Author Michael Marker weaves together stories from Nisga’a Elders in the Nass Valley of British Columbia, Coast Salish Elders in Washington State, and his own experiences as a researcher, teacher educator, and community participant to connect the personal, the political, and the historical themes of Indigenous education. Marker identifies two salient concepts through the developing narrative: first, leaders from an Indigenous consciousness must invigorate traditional spiritual foundations, and, second, they must mobilize knowledge of the land and people—corroded by colonization—toward cultural renewal. Bringing to light the conflicts between local community yearnings and Western institutional goals when engaging in cross-cultural collaborations, this essay puts forth a decolonized approach to educational leadership, one that requires cultural renewal and respect for how a people experience landscape, history, and identity.

    Click here to access this article.
    Michael Marker is an associate professor in the Department of Educational Studies at the University of British Columbia, where he is also the director of Ts”kel Indigenous Graduate Studies. Previously, he was the director of teacher education at Northwest Indian College at the Lummi reservation in Washington State. His work, analyzing the history and politics of Indigenous education, has appeared in Paedagogica Historica, History of Education, History of Education Review, International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, Canadian Journal of Native Education, and Anthropology and Education Quarterly. His present research brings to light ecological education and place-based pedagogies in the Coast Salish region. His forthcoming publications are focused on Indigenous historiographies, traditional ecological knowledge, and Indigenous research methodologies.
  2. Share

    Summer 2015 Issue

    Abstracts

    Undoing Appropriateness
    Raciolinguistic Ideologies and Language Diversity in Education
    NELSON FLORES and JONATHAN ROSA
    Occupational Control in Education
    The Logic and Leverage of Epistemic Communities
    JOSHUA L. GLAZER and DONALD J. PEURACH
    Moral Injury and the Ethics of Educational Injustice
    MEIRA LEVINSON
    Geographies of Indigenous Leaders
    Landscapes and Mindscapes in the Pacific Northwest
    MICHAEL MARKER
    Doing and Teaching Disciplinary Literacy with Adolescent Learners
    A Social and Cultural Enterprise
    ELIZABETH BIRR MOJE

    Book Notes

    How to Innovate
    Mary Moss Brown and Alisa Berger

    Inspiring Teaching
    Sharon Feiman-Nemser, Eran Tamir, and Karen Hammerness