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12/6/2016 12:48:57 AM > 2/22/2017 3:26:34 AM

Breakthrough Strategies

Classroom-Based Practices to Support New Majority College Students
Kathleen A. Ross, Foreword by Michelle Asha Cooper

Breakthrough Strategies identifies effective strategies that faculty have used to help New Majority students—those from minority, immigrant, or disadvantaged backgrounds—build the necessary skills to succeed in college. As the proportion of New Majority students rises, there is increased attention to helping them gain access to college. Once enrolled, however, these students often face significant challenges of adjustment, with few resources for support. Specifically, there is little attention to students’ experiences within their college classrooms and their relationships with professors. At the same time, faculty who work with these students have little guidance on how to help them adjust to new expectations and identities as they engage with college-level work.

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11/29/2016 12:46:28 AM > 2/22/2017 3:26:34 AM

Beyond the Skills Gap

Preparing College Students for Life and Work
Matthew T. Hora with Ross J. Benbow and Amanda K. Oleson

How can educators ensure that young people who attain a postsecondary credential are adequately prepared for the future? Matthew T. Hora and his colleagues explain that the answer is not simply that students need more specialized technical training to meet narrowly defined employment opportunities. Beyond the Skills Gap challenges this conception of the “skills gap,” highlighting instead the value of broader twenty-first-century skills in postsecondary education. They advocate for a system in which employers share responsibility along with the education sector to serve the collective needs of the economy, society, and students.

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11/15/2016 12:45:23 AM > 2/22/2017 3:26:34 AM

The Rising Price of Objectivity

Philanthropy, Government, and the Future of Education Research
Michael J. Feuer, Foreword by Ellen Condliffe Lagemann

In The Rising Price of Objectivity, Michael J. Feuer describes what he sees as a “perfect storm” gathering in the sea of education research. He notes the convergence of three important trends: first, the rise in strategic education philanthropy; second, the decline in federal funding, in part due to ideologically contested priorities; and third, the growing influence of nonacademic think tanks operating outside the constraints of university-based research. Together, he cautions, the combination of these forces threatens scientific research generally, and in particular, jeopardizes the effort to generate independent, credible evidence that is needed to inform and guide our efforts to improve education. 

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11/1/2016 12:41:37 AM > 2/22/2017 3:26:34 AM

Excellence Gaps in Education

Expanding Opportunities for Talented Students
Jonathan A. Plucker and Scott J. Peters

In Excellence Gaps in Education, Jonathan A. Plucker and Scott J. Peters shine a spotlight on “excellence gaps”—the achievement gaps among subgroups of students performing at the highest levels of achievement. Much of the focus of recent education reform has been on closing gaps in achievement between students from different racial, ethnic, or socioeconomic backgrounds by bringing all students up to minimum levels of proficiency. Yet issues related to excellence gaps have been largely absent from discussions about how to improve our schools and communities. Plucker and Peters argue that these significant gaps reflect the existence of a persistent talent underclass in the United States among African American, Hispanic, Native American, and poor students, resulting in an incalculable loss of potential among our fastest growing populations. 

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10/25/2016 12:39:49 AM > 2/22/2017 3:26:34 AM

Charter Schools at the Crossroads

Predicaments, Paradoxes, Possibilities
Chester E. Finn, Jr., Bruno V. Manno, and Brandon L. Wright

Charter Schools at the Crossroads offers a frank and nuanced analysis of the successes and shortcomings of the charter movement, and outlines possible directions for the future. Few observers present at the creation of the first charter schools a quarter-century ago could have predicted how rapidly this movement would spread or how thoroughly it would come to dominate the education reform agenda. And few recent debates in education have been as highly charged as those over charter schools’ roles, responsibilities, and results.

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